Might

Try to get into the habit of using "might" to talk about possibilities. It's like saying maybe. It's also often used in conditional sentences.


A: What are you doing for your holidays this year? B: We might go to the States.

A: Are you going out tonight? B: No, I might stay in for a change.

I might not go to work tomorrow. I don't feel very well.

You might regret agreeing to do it. You should think about it carefully.

She might come with us tomorrow. Do you mind?

A: Where's David? B: He might still be at work.

Spain are very strong at the moment. They might win the World Cup.

It might not be the most exciting place in the world but I like it.

His ex-girlfriend might be coming as well tonight.

You should take an umbrella. It might be raining when you get there.

Be careful! You might fall.

He's got fair hair and blue eyes. He might be English.

If it's sunny, we might go to the country this weekend.

You might catch the bus if you run.



We rarely use "might" in questions.



Like with other modal verbs, we use "might + have + past participle" for past actions.

You might have caught the bus if you had run.

A: Where's John? B: He might have left already.

Don't ring him now. He might not have finished work.

I might have seen this film before. It rings a bell.

If you hadn't been there, I might have said something really stupid.

You might have passed if you had studied a bit harder.



Complete the following sentences:
  1. The weather forecast said it might ...
  2. I am going to a party tonight so I might ... tomorrow.
  3. I might ... or I might ... this weekend.
  4. Take a map because you might ...
  5. You should come with us. You never know you might ...
  6. I can't find my keys. I might ...
  7. You should remind her. She might ...
  8. If the police had reacted quicker, they might ...
  9. There is a train strike today so he might ...
  10. This story sounds familiar. I might ...

Comments

Susana said…
Hi Graham!
1.- It might rain tonight.
2.- I might be late tomorrow
3.- I might go out or I might stay at home this weekend.
4.- ... you might lost.
5.- You never know you might happen.
6.- I might have lost it.
7.- She might go with you.
8.- They might be alive
9.- Might be late.
10.- I might remind it.
Marta said…
1. The weather forecast said it might rain tomorrow.
2. I am going to a party tonight so I might not go to the day trip tomorrow.
3. I might go out or I might stay home this weekend. I haven't already made up my mind.
4. Take a map because you might get lost.
5. You should come with us. You never know you might find your friends.
6. I can't find my keys. I might forget them at home.
7. You should remind her. She might forget the deadline.
8. If the police had reacted quicker, they might avoid the kidnapping.
9. There is a train strike today so he might go there by car.
10. This story sounds familiar. I might hear it anywhere.
Graham said…
1. It might rain tonight/tomorrow.

If it was the weather forecast in Scotland, they would more likely say "It might be sunny tomorrow"

2. I might be late tomorrow.
2. I am going to a party tonight so I might not GO ON THE DAY TRIP tomorrow.

Both are fine. My idea was: "I might have a hangover tomorrow." Mind you, in my case it would be "I'll probably have..."

3. I might go out or I might stay at home this weekend.
3. I might go out or I might stay (at) home this weekend. I HAVEN'T made up my mind YET.

Both answers are fine.

4. Take a map because you might GET LOST.

5. You never know WHAT might happen.
5. You should come with us. You never know YOUR FRIENDS MIGHT BE THERE.


With sentences 6 - 10 my idea was to try to get you to use might in the past.

6. I might have lost THEM(the keys).
6. I might forget them at home. (this is for the future and the verb should be "leave") It should be: "I MIGHT HAVE LEFT THEM AT HOME"

7. She might go with you.
This could make sense.

7. You should remind her. She might forget the deadline.
This is fine if the "forgetting" is in the future.

If the "forgetting" is in the past, how would you complete the sentence?


8.(If the police had reacted quicker) they might be alive(now).
This can make sense.

8. If the police had reacted quicker, they might avoid the kidnapping.
This is wrong. The "avoiding" is in the past. How should the sentence end?


9. (There is a train strike today so he) might be late.
This makes sense as the result is in the present.

9. There is a train strike today so he might go there by car.
Again this makes sense.

If the result of the strike is in the past, the sentence might read: "There is a train strike today so HE MIGHT HAVE TAKEN the car.


10. I might remind it. This has no sense at all. Sorry Susana. :-)

10. This story sounds familiar. I might hear it SOMEWHERE.
Again, the result is in the past.

So how should the sentence end?
Marta said…
7. You should remind her. She might have forgotten the deadline.
8. If the police had reacted quicker, they might have had avoid the kidnapping.
10. This story sounds familiar. I might have heard it somewhere.
Graham said…
Hi Marta

8. If the police had reacted quicker, they MIGHT HAVE AVOIDED the kidnapping.
10. This story sounds familiar. I might have heard it somewhere BEFORE.

As with any new structure, you should think of some of your own clear examples. Just think how you would use it in Spanish and write it down in English.

I'll be happy to correct anything.
Montse said…
Hi, Graham. I've done the exercise without seeing the answers.

1. The weather forecast said it might be cloudy
2. I am going to a party tonight so I might not go to class tomorrow.
3. I might go out or I might stay at home this weekend.
4. Take a map because you might lose your way
5. You should come with us. You never know you might like it
6. I can't find my keys. I might have left them in the kitchen
7. You should remind her. She might be waiting for you.
8. If the police had reacted quicker, they might not have escaped
9. There is a train strike today so he might not get here until tomorrow.
10. This story sounds familiar. I might have heard it before.
Graham said…
Montse:

Ten out of ten. Perfect. :-)
Anonymous said…
New exercise. This time with might, José Luis

1. The weather forecast said it might RAIN ALL THE WEEK
2. I am going to a party tonight so I might BE RELAXED tomorrow.
3. I might GO or I might NOT GO this weekend.
4. Take a map because you might NOT FIND THE HOUSE
5. You should come with us. You never know you might FIND IN THIS PLACE
6. I can't find my keys. I might HAVE LOST THEM
7. You should remind her. She might BE WRONG
8. If the police had reacted quicker, they might HAVE BEEN ARRESTED
9. There is a train strike today so he might ARRIVE LATE
10. This story sounds familiar. I might REMENBER IT EASILY
Graham said…
Morning JL,

You should also do the posts about beautifulpeople.com and Henry VIII. They might help you with modals and will be useful for the exam.

New exercise. This time with might, José Luis

1. The weather forecast said it might RAIN ALL WEEK.

2. I am going to a party tonight so I might BE RELAXED tomorrow. (Not sure what you mean here - Perhaps, you might have to take things easy.£

5. You should come with us. You never know you might FIND IN THIS PLACE (again, I'm not sure what you mean. Maybe, you might feel at home.)

The others are fine.

Well done Prof!

Anonymous said…
Thanks Graham for the corrections. When I write "You never know you might FIND IN THIS PLACE" I mean that this place can be dangerous.
And when I write "I might BE RELAXED tomorrow" I mean that next day I'll feel rested.
José Luis
Graham said…
José Luis,

In that case you should have said - You should come with us. You never know what you might find there.

I find it strange that you'd feel relaxed the night after a party. I'd have a hangover for sure LOL

You might be confusing party with (public) holiday.


By the way, you seem to be very shy on Twitter. :-)