Post-holiday blues

Summer holidays cause half of workers to consider quitting


Nearly half of all workers consider quitting their jobs immediately after their summer holiday, says a poll.

A total of 46 per cent of those returning to work get such post-holiday blues they think of finding a new post.

But the survey for home rentals site DirectHoliday-Bookings.co.uk found once they had settled back, 87 per cent said their break left them feeling refreshed.

The website boss Andrew Gibson said: "Holidays are a vital to recharge the batteries and reflect on your life."

The findings of the survey were backed by recruitment experts. One said: "We receive more CVs in September than any other month."

Source: Daily Mirror




How do you feel to be back at work? What was the first day back like? What did you do?

Comments

Anonymous said…
Are you suffering from Post Holiday Syndrome?

Hi, Graham, I find interesting all related with post-holiday syndrome, but I don’t agree with the main conclusions.
First of all, I think it’s an exaggeration to talk about bad experiences like tiredness, lack of appetite or muscle ache. I don’t believe that these kinds of symptoms are commons. Of course, depends on the kind of job and, above all, on the psychological attitude, but, in my opinion, the people don’t suffer this traumatic situation in the most of the jobs when they get back into a routine. For the same reason, I don’t find necessary to think in buffer days in order to overcome the first day of job without anxiety or planning out during half an hour how to getting back into the work. Definitely, I think that the researchers at the University of Granada and the others professionals should pay attention to other more interesting matters.
We forget that the holidays weren’t commons before the Second World War. It’s a privilege of the recent generations. So, the most of the workers in the world didn’t have holidays because these didn’t exist. I can’t imagine what would be the reaction of the workers today if they had to renounce your holidays...
Finally, I find some advices of the experts very poor. Is it really important cut back TV viewing during the holidays in order to achieve best emotional situation? And, above all, I don’t find others advices that, in my opinion, are more interesting: visit museums, read novels, watch cinema, etc. I have the impression that the author of this article is thinking at all times in a concrete social class, but the present world is varied
José Luis, professor
Graham said…
Hi José Luis,

I did try to reply to you yesterday but the computer screen froze and I couldn't send my comment. I wasn't a happy chappy.

I find myself agreeing with you again.



I find everything related to the post-holiday syndrome interesting, but I don’t agree with the main conclusions.

First of all, I think it’s an exaggeration to talk about bad experiences like tiredness, lack of appetite or muscle ache. I don’t believe that these kinds of symptoms are common. Of course, it depends on the kind of job and, above all, on the psychological attitude, but, in my opinion, people don’t suffer this traumatic situation in most jobs when they get back into a routine.

For the same reason, I don’t find it necessary to think about buffer days in order to overcome the first day of work without anxiety or planning for half an hour how to get back into work.

Definitely, I think that the researchers at the University of Granada and the other professionals should be concerned about other more interesting matters.

We forget that holidays weren’t common before the Second World War. It’s a privilege of recent generations. So, most workers in the world didn’t have holidays because these didn’t exist. I can’t imagine what the reaction of workers today would be if they had to renounce their holidays.

Finally, I find some of the advice from the experts very poor. Is it really important to cut back on TV viewing during the holidays in order to achieve a better emotional state?

And, above all, I don’t find other advice that, in my opinion, is more interesting: visiting museums, reading novels, going to the cinema, etc. I have the impression that the author of this article is thinking of a specific social class all the time, but the present world is a varied one.