Government faces corruption allegations

Top PP officials shown to have taken payments on the side Source: El País in English

(1) El País said (that) politicians from the Popular Party had accepted illegal payments.

(2) El País accused PP politicians of accepting illegal payments.



Rajoy on slush fund: “It is all untrue, except for some things” Source: El País in English

(1) Rajoy told reporters (that) it was all untrue.

(2) Rajoy denied receiving any illegal payments.



Spain Socialist leader Rubalcaba tells PM Rajoy to go Source: BBC News

(1) Rubalcaba said (that) Rajoy had to resign.

(2) Rubalcaba told Rajoy to resign.


(1) Reported Speech           (2) Reporting Verbs/Verb Patterns





Spanish Prime Minister Rajoy denies slush fund allegations Source: Newsy (video with transcript)





Spain: PM under fire over renewed corruption claims Source: BBC News (video)


Here is the transcript for the above link. Before you listen, read it and choose the correct word(s). What is the difference between them? Then check to see if you are right.


This was one of his hardest press conferences (1) from / since becoming Prime Minister.
Mariano Rajoy, alongside Angela Merkel, had to answer questions over potentially damaging allegations that he and other senior members of his party received improper payments.
"I must reiterate what I said last Saturday. Everything that pertains to myself and my fellow party members is not right. What has been published by the media, or put in a different manner, is completely and utterly false. The government is determined and strong. It is a difficult moment but we will (2) get away with / get through this and we will do so for one reason only, because the things that have been said are absolutely false. I said this on Saturday and I will say it again…"
Unlike the two leaders’ press conference, the (3) subject / matter of their meeting was the economy. Both Mrs. Merkel and Mr. Rajoy talk the same language of austerity as a fix for the Eurozone’s problems.
And back in Spain, more and more young Spaniards are (4) also / too  learning the language of Mrs. Merkel. German classes are for some seen as a way out because there are ever fewer jobs here at home.
"There is nothing here so now I have to leave. This is not what I wanted to do. If there is nothing they can give me, I can’t stay here and do something different. I (5) have been studying / am studying  for five years and my parents invested in me, it would all be for nothing."
Unemployment (6) raised / rose again in January according to the government’s monthly figures. (7)Among / between  those out of work is 24 year old Ana García.
She says last year she would spend nights searching on the internet for work. Now she searches less to keep her stress levels down.
It’s been a difficult few days for Spain’s Prime Minister who (8) denies / refuses all the allegations against him. His party is now on the offensive promising legal action against those responsible for the documents published in El País newspaper.
(9) Despite / although calls from his critics, there is no sign from Rajoy that he is thinking of stepping down.
But rightly or wrongly, some people are now questioning the credibility of a leader pushing through painful and unpopular austerity measures and this scandal is still dominating the (10) headlines / titles here in Spain.

Comments

José said…
Hi Graham,

I like this exercise. It’s very pedagogical, others too, of course. I’m going to choose the word that is correct, in my opinion, and to explain the difference between both options. I apologize you for I’m not going to check if my answers are right. I prefer that you check my responses and after I’ll listen to Spanish Prime Minister, if you don’t mind.

1.- Since, because it says about temporal space, no location.
2.- Get through, because it means get over this moment.
3.- Matter, their meeting was about economic matter, no subject like maths.
4.- Also, it means to link two clauses and too is harder. Also is rather than too.
5.- Have been studying, the action is present perfect continuous, the action continues for five years and it has effects in the present.
6.- Rose, we use the verb rise to talk about the increment of rates.
7.- Among, unemployed are a lot, no two.
8.- Denies, he said that what they said is not right, then deny instead of refuse.
9.- Despite, after despite it goes a noun.
10.- Headlines, because they talk about a newspaper, no a book.

Having said that, if these answers are not right it’s because of Mr. Rajoy doesn’t know English.

See you.
Graham said…
Hi José,

You do like to make me work, don't you? :-)

Thanks for choosing a post which didn't have any comments. It means that I didn't waste my time.


I apologize because I’m not going to check if my answers are right. I'd rather you check my responses and then I’ll listen to the Spanish Prime Minister, if you don’t mind.

1.- Since (+ when action started). ... since becoming / since he became .... RIGHT
2.- Get through, because it means get over this moment. RIGHT
3.- Subject (in this context it is like a topic - what you talk about)
4.- Also RIGHT (also + verbs, too at end of sentence)
5.- Have been studying, the action is present perfect continuous, the action continues for five years and it has effects in the present. RIGHT
6.- Rose. RIGHT (raise + obect)
7.- Among RIGHT unemployed are a lot, not two.
8.- Denies RIGHT he said that what they said is not right, then deny instead of refuse.
9.- Despite RIGHT There is a noun after despite.
10.- Headlines RIGHT because they talk about a newspaper, not a book.

Having said that, if these answers are not right, it’s because Mr. Rajoy doesn’t know English.


Well done!