Stress at work

Tuesday at 10am is most stressful time of week


Half of British employees pin-pointed mid-morning on Tuesday as their 'stress peak' - when their workload becomes 'too much' and they start to crumble under the pressure.

The (1) most/majority of workers said they coast through Monday getting their brain in gear and *catch up with gossip from the weekend and (2) discussing/speaking TV shows they've watched.

But on Tuesday reality sets in and staff spend the very first part of the day *going through emails they ignored on Monday before planning the week (3) forward/ahead.

And they're faced with a mountain of a to-do list to tackle and struggle with their boss' demands or impending deadlines.

A spokesman for leading recruitment agency Michael Page, which (4) made/carried out the research of 3,000 Brits, said: ''It seems our jobs are the biggest cause of stress in our lives - even little things like the computer freezing - is enough to get us *worked up.

''Whether we feel over-worked, are neck deep in paper or just battling a to-do list which seems never-ending, we are all in in agreement when we hit our melting point.

''It's worrying (5) such a/ a so large number of us are under (6) so many/so much pressure from bosses and there not being (7) enough hours/hours enough in the day that we go home and have an alcoholic drink to recover.

''But it is encouraging to see we are taking steps* to improve our working lives, with people making it a New Year's resolution to get out of their (8) actual/current job.''

The study of office workers aged between 18 and 45 quizzed respondents on their level of stress throughout the typical working week.

It found a quarter regularly feel stressed at work and for three quarters of workers they regularly come to the end of their tether* by 11.16am each day.

But one in five find it gets too much before nine o'clock.

Four in ten blamed heavy workloads and a third (9) said/told dealing with difficult clients or customers left them feeling frazzled.

Yet three in ten admitted it was their boss which caused them tension in the office and one in six blamed their colleagues for (10) not/don't listening to their cries for help.


Source: The Telegraph



You will notice you have to choose the correct option (1-10) to complete the text.

What is your most stressful time of the week?


Phrasal Verbs:

* catch up: when you have missed something and you need to discover what happened
  • I have been off work for two weeks. I will need to catch up on all what's been happening in my absence.
  • I've missed 4 episodes of my favourite series. I have a lot of catching up to do.
* go through: to examine something carefully
  • I'd like to go through the report with you again. There were a couple of points that I didn't fully understand.
  • I have been through all my pockets but I still can't find my keys.
* work up: to feel upset or strong emotions
  • Try not to work yourself up about the exams. You will pass without any problems.
  • He gets so worked up about things. He needs to learn to take things easy.


Idioms:

*at the end of your tether: when you don't have any strength or patience left
  • I am at the end of my tether. I really don't know how to get these kids to behave.
  • Be careful! I'm reaching the end of my tether with you.
*take steps: to do what it is necessary to prevent something
  • The government is taking steps to ensure that such a thing never happens again.
  • We need to take steps now to minimise the effects of climate change.

Comments

Montse said…
Hi, Graham. The text was quite difficult for me because of a lot of new words, phrasal verbs and idioms.
I never know when my most stressful time of the week is going to be. It depends on many things but, usually, it’s when my boss wants me to do something special.
These are the words that I’ve chosen:

1. majority
2. discussing
3. ahead
4. carried out
5. such a
6. so much
7. hours enough
8. current
9. said
10. not listening
Graham said…
9 out if 10! :-)

7. enough + noun / adjective + enough

He has enough money / he's rich enough
Anonymous said…
Hi Graham! It's Inés. There are a lot of new expressions and phrasal verbs in this text which I didn't know before, so next Wednesday I'll explain some of them. Anyway, choosing the correct option here was quite easy.
1. majority
2. discussing
3. ahead
4. carried
5. such a
6. so much
7. enough hours
8. current
9. said
10. not

See you soon
Graham said…
Hi Inés,

100% right. Well done!

Cristina said…
Hi Graham! It's Cristina

It's a really hard text to read, at least for me, because it has a lot of words that I had never seen and I have spent all the time seeking the words in the dictionary, but it's the only way to learn a new vocabulary :)

I think that my most stressful time of the week is when at last hour on Fridays the boss said me that I have to do someting before I go out. In that moment I feel that the weekend is never going to arrive

See you on Monday!






Graham said…
Hi Cristina,

There will be a lot of unfamiliar expressions in this article but don't let that stress you out. You should read it for gist at first and then look up some of the words in the dictionary.


It's a really hard text to read, at least for me, because it has a lot of words that I had never seen and I have spent all the time looking up the words in the dictionary, but it's the only way to learn new vocabulary :)

I think that my most stressful time of the week is when last thing on Fridays the boss tells me that I have to do something before I leave*. In that moment I feel that the weekend is never going to arrive.

*What's the difference between "leave" and "go out"?
Cristina said…
Hi Graham!

Maybe "go out" means go outside when you want it and "leave" has to do with obtaining permission

It is the only thing that I can say apart from "go out" is a phrasal verb and "leave" not
Graham said…
Hi Cristina,

Nice idea.

I leave home at around 9 each morning. ( we leave a place, the opposite would be "arrive at")

And we go out for a drink or go out with friends. (

Are you going out this weekend? ( the opposite would be "stay in / stay at home")